Fingerprint affordances on touch screens

My colleague Martin Kačmar from Brno recently visited our Haarlem office. Apart from attending the terrific PhoneGap Day we couldn’t let this opportunity go by to show him some examples of what Holland is really like. Hence, a visit to the Zaanse Schans was arranged. During our tour through the outdoor museum we visited “Specerijenmolen De Huisman“, a mill which was used for grinding herbs and spices in the good old days (no, not that kind of herbs…).

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Google’s Changed Password Reminder

Two weeks ago I lost my fantastic Nexus S at Awakenings Festival. Five years back this wouldn’t be such a big problem. But nowadays that small device contains my entire (personal and business) life. I had a track-my-device app installed, but as the network was overloaded by 30.000 people asking each other “Where are you?” on WhatsApp, it didn’t work.

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Information Overload @ UX Cocktail Hour

I love those talks where you are first blown away by the sheer brilliance of the subject (and the speaker), then get that feeling “it’s so obvious, how could I not have seen that?“. Those are the best. It’s the only occasion where you walk out feeling so incredibly dumb, yet with a big smile on your face.

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Design Beautiful Errors

I love contingency design: the very important details of handling errors and turning a negative user experience into a positive one. Usually when working on form interaction I design four things:

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Leverage Your Error Reports

When Google Chrome can’t reach a website, and has received the same outcome from multiple Chrome users, it reports that you’re not the only one struggling with the website. This is helpful, because as a user you learn that the problem is probably not on your end.

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Blink

During my last holiday I read Blink, Malcolm Gladwell’s second book. In this book Gladwell explains thin-slicing, a technique we apply to get a snap judgement on someone or something. We are usually taught to ignore this gut feeling. To base our judgements on a rational thought process. But in this book Gladwell makes a strong argument that thin-slicing can be worth more than years of rational research.

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